WoMI Revealed As Next-Generation Customer Experience Metric

WoMI Revealed As Next-Generation Customer Experience MetricRetail Touch Points

November 18, 2013

Simple evaluations of customers’ shopping experiences can deliver the analytics retailers need to assess and improve the customer experience.

New research from ForeSee revealed a next–generation customer experience metric: the Word of Mouth Index (WoMI). By incorporating a second feedback question, WoMI measures both positive and negative word-of-mouth, generating more actionable and precise data and insights for retail leaders. Read the full article »

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Harley-Davidson, Apple, Avon, Amazon Tops In WOM

Harley-Davidson, Apple, Avon, Amazon Tops In WOM | The Word of Mouth IndexMarketing Daily

October 22, 2013 | by Tanya Irwin

What do Harley-Davidson, Apple, Avon, and Amazon have in common?

Those brands scored the highest “word of mouth” in their respective industries, according to new research from ForeSee.

The report, “The Word of Mouth Index: Top 100 Brand Edition,” is based on more than 21,000 consumer surveys.

The Word of Mouth Index was designed by ForeSee to help companies accurately measure customer satisfaction. Read the full article »

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Contemplating the Next Customer Experience Measurement

Contemplating the Next Customer Experience Measurement1to1 Media

August 13, 2013 | by Tom Hoffman

A few months ago while attending the ForeSee Summit in Ann Arbor, Mich., I had the good fortune to hear Larry Freed share the company’s rationale for developing the Word-of-Mouth Index (WoMI), a next-generation customer experience metric. While traditional single-question metrics are focused on measuring a customer’s likelihood to recommend based on a zero to ten point rating scale, WoMI goes more in depth in examining a customer’s likelihood to recommend or to discourage. Read the full article »

 

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Time to Retire the Score?

Time to Retire the Net Promoter Score?All Analytics

July 18, 2013 | by Beth Schultz

Some companies are starting to turn away from or at least reduce their reliance on the highly popular decade-old customer loyalty metric that measures likelihood to recommend. This metric, which predates the advent of the social web and its instant Like-ability, is culled from the responses to one basic question: “What is the likelihood that you would recommend Company X to a friend or colleague?” Respondents answer on a scale of 0-10, landing themselves in one of three categories. Promoters (10 and 9) are “loyal enthusiasts who keep buying from a company and urge their friends to do the same.” Passives (8 and 7) are “satisfied but enthusiastic.” Detractors (6 and lower) are unhappy customers. The score is derived by subtracting the percentage of detractors from the percentage of promoters.

Simple, right? It’s too simple, Jason Faria, director of customer service at the flash online retailer Ideeli, said in a press release. Ideeli now uses the Word-of-Mouth Index (WoMI). Read the full article »

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Discrepancies Found Between Word-of-Mouth Recommendation Scores

Discrepancies Found Between WoMI and Net Promoter Score1to1 Media

July 18, 2013 | by Anna Papachristos

According to “The Word of Mouth Index: Top 100 Brand Edition” report, ForeSee’s Word of Mouth Index (WoMI) benchmark study that explores the customer loyalty scores for the top 100 U.S. Brands, “detractor” behavior is typically overestimated. In many instances, those who qualify as detractors under one methodology—those who rate their likelihood to recommend between one and six—are actually neutral toward the brand itself. Many, in fact, are even advocates for the company, but simply do not rank themselves as fervent recommenders. Read the full article »

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Spending Too Much Time On a Single Metric Could Be Driving Customers Away, ForeSee Claims

Spending Too Much Time On NPS Could Be Driving Customers AwayFierce Retail

July 17, 2013 | by Frank Hayes

Customer analytics company ForeSee says retailers may spend too much time and money worrying about the results of “the ultimate question”—and might even be alienating some customers as a result.

ForeSee argues that some of those “detractors” are really neutral, and won’t actually badmouth the chain or brand. Its “Word-of-Mouth Index” (WOMI), which ForeSee says it spent the past two years developing, adds a second question, asking customers how likely they are to discourage others from doing business with the company, then subtracts the percentage of “true detractors” (a score of 9 or 10 on the “discourage” question) from the “promoters.” Read the full article »

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